Ad Astra


“Paper Neighborhood is a set of 21 vulcanized rubber stamps, each depicting a single characteristic of Italianate-style architecture. This style was common in the late 19th century and can still be found in historic neighborhoods such as Over-the-Rhine in Cincinnati, Ohio.”

Paper Neighborhood is a set of 21 vulcanized rubber stamps, each depicting a single characteristic of Italianate-style architecture. This style was common in the late 19th century and can still be found in historic neighborhoods such as Over-the-Rhine in Cincinnati, Ohio.”

(via heliophobus)

publicdomainthing:

Great Hall. Detail of ceiling and cove showing sculpture of two female half-figures. Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, Washington.
Carol M. Highsmith
Library of Congress

publicdomainthing:

Great Hall. Detail of ceiling and cove showing sculpture of two female half-figures. Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, Washington.

Carol M. Highsmith

Library of Congress

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals — sounds that say listen to this, it is important.

—Gary Provost, from Roy Peter Clark’s Writing Tools (via quynhii)

(Source: beautemillesimee, via quynhii)

Fuck them is what I say. I hate those e-books. They cannot be the future. They may well be. I will be dead. I won’t give a shit.

Renowned children’s book author MAURICE SENDAK, telling us how he really feels, on The Colbert Report. (via inothernews)

(via inothernews)

Many assert that, while they can get along just fine without an imaginary friend, most human beings will always need to believe in God. In my experience, people holding this opinion never seem to notice how condescending, unimaginative, and pessimistic a view it is of the rest of humanity - and of generations to come. There are social, economic, environmental, and geopolitical costs to this strategy of benign neglect - ranging from personal hypocrisy to public policies that needlessly undermine the health and safety of millions. Nevertheless, many scientists seem to worry that subjecting people’s religious beliefs to criticism will start a war of ideas that science cannot win. I believe they are wrong. More important, I am confident that we will eventually have no choice in the matter. Zero-sum conflicts have a way of becoming explicit.

—Sam Harris - The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values (via therecipe)